Cookware Tips

Is a heavier pot or pan always better than a light one? Top-of-the-line cookware is usually heavier than less expensive brands. The heavier a pot or pan is, the more securely it will sit on the stovetop. However, you do need to be able to lift if off the burner with ease. If it’s too heavy for you, it could cause other hazards.

Is there one material for cookware that is recommended above the others? Each type of material can be very beneficial depending on your specific cooking application. No one type is universally the best. They all have advantages and disadvantages. See our cookware materials guide for more information.

In 18/10 stainless steel the 18 refers to the percentage of chromium that is found in the steel. It’s important because it helps to fend off corrosion. The 10 refers to the percentage of nickel in the piece. This also fights against corrosion and helps give your cookware a shiny finish. You can also find 18/8 stainless steel.

Use pans with flat bottoms for the proper heating elements in a ceramic stove top to function optimally. For more information, consult your stove top manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations.

Heavy-gauge construction is a primary feature in great cookware. If it’s not thick enough, it’s not going to conduct heat properly. Other features include stay-cool, oven-safe handles, even heat conductivity and a nonreactive cooking surface. Always be sure to look for features specific to your individual cooking needs.

What type of utensil works the best with cookware? This depends on the material your cookware is made of. Nonstick surfaces will scratch easily and should be used with nylon or wooden utensils. Copper, aluminum and stainless steel are very scratch-resistant, and could be used with metal utensils.

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